I was a bit skeptical about spending $10 or so a month on two blokes telling me how to swing a golf club on the net, how wrong was I. I just wanted to... say a massive thank you to you both, my game has improved so much in the 4 months that I've been a member and now all I want to do is play or hit balls at the range. Also, Andy did a little segment on chipping from the rough and coming down onto the ball.....well anyway I had a shot like that and I thought to myself what did the boys tell me to do. I was literally 5cm away from the water in sand with little back swing, so I've come down on to the ball and I got out (it didn't go far, but I got out) with out dropping a shot, so again thank you so so much for your great videos, loving every one of them. Cheers! Read More
I love your site. Your instruction is just fantastic. The combination of video with explanation and correction drills is superb. I am a single digit h... andicapper who basically knows my swing and its faults. Your videos have really helped my ball striking and short game. You guys are such good teachers. You teach directly and plainly without all the nonsense, plus you both have beautiful swings which helps a visual learner like me to emulate. I am so glad that I joined. Your site is very well organized and easy to navigate. I love the fact that I can create my own categories and save videos to refer back to later. I am so glad that I found this. Thanks a bunch! Read More
He was soon cast in his first British movie, playing a murderous actor in Train of Events (1949). Critic C. A. Lejeune praised his work in the London Observer commenting that he "adds good cheekbones to a quick intelligence and is likely to become a cult, I fear."[19] The Scotsman said "he should be regarded as one of the most hopeful recruits to the British screen."[20]
Frederick George Peter Ingle Finch (28 September 1916 – 14 January 1977) was an English-Australian actor.[1][2] He is best remembered for his role as crazed television anchorman Howard Beale in the film Network, which earned him a posthumous Academy Award for Best Actor, his fifth Best Actor award from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, and a Best Actor award from the Golden Globes.
In 1934–35 he appeared in a number of productions for Doris Fitton at the Savoy Theatre, some with a young Sumner Locke Elliott. He also worked as a sideshow spruiker at the Sydney Royal Easter Show, in vaudeville with Joe Cody and as a foil to American comedian Bert le Blanc.[13] At age 19 Finch toured Australia with George Sorlie's travelling troupe.
He did radio acting work with Hugh Denison's BSA Players (for Broadcasting Service Association, later to become Macquarie Players). He came to the attention of Australian Broadcasting Commission radio drama producer Lawrence H. Cecil, who was to act as his coach and mentor throughout 1939 and 1940. He was "Chris" in the Children's Session and the first Muddle-Headed Wombat.
We all say we're going to quit occasionally. I'd like to have been more adventurous in my career. But it's a fascinating and not ignoble profession. No one lives more lives than the actor. Movie making is like geometry and I hated maths. But this kind of jigsaw I relish. When I played Lord Nelson I worked the poop deck in his uniform. I got extraordinary shivers. Sometimes I felt like I was staring at my own coffin. I touched that character. There lies the madness. You can't fake it.[32]
Finch co-wrote and directed an award-winning short film, The Day (1960) and announced plans to direct a feature but it did not eventuate. He won his third BAFTA for Best Actor for No Love for Johnnie (1961), although like Oscar Wilde, the film lost money. He was originally chosen to play Julius Caesar in Cleopatra (1963) and filmed scenes in London, but when the film was postponed he withdrew; the role was recast with Rex Harrison.
Finch returned to Australia to make The Shiralee (1957), one of his favourite parts, and the tenth most popular movie at the British box office that year. He followed it with another Australian story, the bushranger tale Robbery Under Arms (1957), which did less well. However exhibitors still voted Finch the third most popular British star of 1957, and the fifth most popular overall, regardless of nationality.[28]
Finch co-wrote and directed an award-winning short film, The Day (1960) and announced plans to direct a feature but it did not eventuate. He won his third BAFTA for Best Actor for No Love for Johnnie (1961), although like Oscar Wilde, the film lost money. He was originally chosen to play Julius Caesar in Cleopatra (1963) and filmed scenes in London, but when the film was postponed he withdrew; the role was recast with Rex Harrison.

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