George Finch was born in New South Wales, Australia, but was educated in Paris and Zürich. He was a research chemist when he moved to Britain in 1912 and later served during the First World War with the Royal Army Ordnance Depot and the Royal Field Artillery.[8] In 1915, at Portsmouth, Hampshire, George married Alicia Fisher, the daughter of a Kent barrister.[5] However, George Finch was not Peter Finch's biological father. He learned only in his mid-40s that his biological father was Wentworth Edward Dallas "Jock" Campbell, an Indian Army officer, whose adultery with Finch's mother was the cause of George and Alicia's divorce, when Peter was two years old.[2] Alicia Finch married Jock Campbell in 1922.[5]
Mike and I started this journey in January of 2017. What started as a simple passion project to make fun golf videos of amazing courses has taken us to places we would never have imagined back then. Through the years we've been blessed to be able to meet so many great people and experience so many amazing courses. If there's anything you take away from our journey its this: do what you love and do it with conviction. The rest will take care of itself.
Finch's film roles increased in size and prestige through the early 1950s. For Walt Disney he played the Sheriff of Nottingham in The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952). He was given two good roles in films from Alexander Korda: as Richard D'Oyly Carte in The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan (1953), and as a priest in The Heart of the Matter (1953), from the Graham Greene novel.
I started to play golf more seriously over the last couple of years. I needed to look at my swing and how to be more consistent. I viewed a lot of on-... line coaching videos, but nothing seemed to connect with me until I came across “Meandmygolf”. Both Piers and Andy seems to explain the fundamentals in a way I understand. All the help and practice has taken me from a 24 handicap to a 16, and I am looking to get down to single figures this year with the help of Meandmygolf #takecharge. Read More 

In 1934–35 he appeared in a number of productions for Doris Fitton at the Savoy Theatre, some with a young Sumner Locke Elliott. He also worked as a sideshow spruiker at the Sydney Royal Easter Show, in vaudeville with Joe Cody and as a foil to American comedian Bert le Blanc.[13] At age 19 Finch toured Australia with George Sorlie's travelling troupe.
Finch returned to Australia to make The Shiralee (1957), one of his favourite parts, and the tenth most popular movie at the British box office that year. He followed it with another Australian story, the bushranger tale Robbery Under Arms (1957), which did less well. However exhibitors still voted Finch the third most popular British star of 1957, and the fifth most popular overall, regardless of nationality.[28]
I've been playing golf my whole life. I've always hit a high, short, slice. I also typically hit everything fat. I joined Me and My Golf several month... s ago and began watching the videos on striking the ball pure. It was a light bulb moment for me. The golf swing finally made sense. After working through the drills, my game has totally changed. I'm hitting a draw. I'm making solid contact, and I've added about 45 yards to my five iron. I can't say thank you enough. Read More
Finch's film roles increased in size and prestige through the early 1950s. For Walt Disney he played the Sheriff of Nottingham in The Story of Robin Hood and His Merrie Men (1952). He was given two good roles in films from Alexander Korda: as Richard D'Oyly Carte in The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan (1953), and as a priest in The Heart of the Matter (1953), from the Graham Greene novel.

He was soon cast in his first British movie, playing a murderous actor in Train of Events (1949). Critic C. A. Lejeune praised his work in the London Observer commenting that he "adds good cheekbones to a quick intelligence and is likely to become a cult, I fear."[19] The Scotsman said "he should be regarded as one of the most hopeful recruits to the British screen."[20]


I started to play golf more seriously over the last couple of years. I needed to look at my swing and how to be more consistent. I viewed a lot of on-... line coaching videos, but nothing seemed to connect with me until I came across “Meandmygolf”. Both Piers and Andy seems to explain the fundamentals in a way I understand. All the help and practice has taken me from a 24 handicap to a 16, and I am looking to get down to single figures this year with the help of Meandmygolf #takecharge. Read More
I have recently joined, but I have been watching the videos for a few months now and they really have made an impact on my game. The level of instruct... ion given in such short videos is the perfect combination. I have learned a lot from the website and videos and I do feel that I am taking charge of my game. Thanks for your videos and instruction. Read More

He was soon cast in his first British movie, playing a murderous actor in Train of Events (1949). Critic C. A. Lejeune praised his work in the London Observer commenting that he "adds good cheekbones to a quick intelligence and is likely to become a cult, I fear."[19] The Scotsman said "he should be regarded as one of the most hopeful recruits to the British screen."[20]
Not sure how many of y’all are watching their stuff on YouTube but they are doing good on-course vlogs at some classy courses in California. Seems that they found a good niche and they definitely have a lot of entertaining golf content to compete with the Brits (Chris Ryan, Shiels, Finch, Crossfield, Me and My Golf, etc.). I find myself looking more forward to their stuff than the others at this point, mostly because of their banter and the videography.
My son often dials up their videos and invites me to sit and watch with him. Pretty fun to watch. We live in California and my son has said, "I want to play with these guys. Maybe they'll play Montreux with us." Heck, we'd like to have them at our CC here in the Sacto area. They'd probably like the course. Will have to reach out... I dig their hats and will be getting a couple of them.

I learned to play golf at a very young age and at my best I was around a 12 handicap. After college I started to play golf more frequently again and w... as struggling the past two years to get under a 14 handicap. Thanks to Andy and Piers I am down to an 11in the past month and trending down. It had been years since I revisited the basics (i.e. chip vs. pitch, how one should address the ball, finishing your swing). It is because of this I have been able to shave strokes off my game. Whether you are a 24 or a 4 there is something Me and My Golf can teach you! I missed a 15 foot birdie the other day to break 80 for the first time ever! With their help, I hope to accomplish that goal before the snow sets in. Read More
NEW PODCAST OUT & it’s a big one! Discussing: Callaway Mavrik drivers How accurate are club reviews? Rick Shiels Merch Are handicaps always a good thing? Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-rick-shiels-golf-show/id1406443091#episodeGuid=Buzzsprout-2445533 … Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/1CYDydquWZm6ZYNe5m0b6i?si=ZmYGGspkRim2B85-ZQYB_w …pic.twitter.com/Azb8YvHFX1

Frederick George Peter Ingle Finch (28 September 1916 – 14 January 1977) was an English-Australian actor.[1][2] He is best remembered for his role as crazed television anchorman Howard Beale in the film Network, which earned him a posthumous Academy Award for Best Actor, his fifth Best Actor award from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts, and a Best Actor award from the Golden Globes.

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