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During his war service Finch was given leave to act in radio, theatre and film. He appeared in a number of propaganda shorts, including Another Threshold (1942), These Stars Are Mine (1943), While There is Still Time (1943) and South West Pacific (1943), the latter for Ken G. Hall. He also appeared in two of the few Australian feature films made during the war, The Rats of Tobruk (1944) and the less distinguished Red Sky at Morning (1944).


Categories: 1916 births1977 deathsAustralian Army soldiersAustralian expatriate male actors in the United StatesAustralian male film actorsAustralian military personnel of World War IIAustralian people of English descentAustralian male radio actorsAustralian male stage actorsBAFTA winners (people)Best Actor BAFTA Award winnersBest Actor Academy Award winnersBest Drama Actor Golden Globe (film) winnersBurials at Hollywood Forever CemeteryMale actors from SydneySilver Bear for Best Actor winners20th-century Australian male actors
We all say we're going to quit occasionally. I'd like to have been more adventurous in my career. But it's a fascinating and not ignoble profession. No one lives more lives than the actor. Movie making is like geometry and I hated maths. But this kind of jigsaw I relish. When I played Lord Nelson I worked the poop deck in his uniform. I got extraordinary shivers. Sometimes I felt like I was staring at my own coffin. I touched that character. There lies the madness. You can't fake it.[32]
Finch returned to Australia to make The Shiralee (1957), one of his favourite parts, and the tenth most popular movie at the British box office that year. He followed it with another Australian story, the bushranger tale Robbery Under Arms (1957), which did less well. However exhibitors still voted Finch the third most popular British star of 1957, and the fifth most popular overall, regardless of nationality.[28]
Categories: 1916 births1977 deathsAustralian Army soldiersAustralian expatriate male actors in the United StatesAustralian male film actorsAustralian military personnel of World War IIAustralian people of English descentAustralian male radio actorsAustralian male stage actorsBAFTA winners (people)Best Actor BAFTA Award winnersBest Actor Academy Award winnersBest Drama Actor Golden Globe (film) winnersBurials at Hollywood Forever CemeteryMale actors from SydneySilver Bear for Best Actor winners20th-century Australian male actors
Finch co-wrote and directed an award-winning short film, The Day (1960) and announced plans to direct a feature but it did not eventuate. He won his third BAFTA for Best Actor for No Love for Johnnie (1961), although like Oscar Wilde, the film lost money. He was originally chosen to play Julius Caesar in Cleopatra (1963) and filmed scenes in London, but when the film was postponed he withdrew; the role was recast with Rex Harrison.
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